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The Technician
No Imperfections Noted
The Jeff and Casey Show
Jeff and Casey Time
Casey Muratori
Seattle, WA
Cracking the Universe
"Less, in a Kleenex."
Original air date: January 1st, 2010
Topics. The unified field theory. Divining rods. Albert Einstein. Unicorns. Great literature. Zip-state. Rainbows. David Cornelius Doremus. The Talmud. The immune system. Cracking teh Universe. The Special Theory of Relativity. Doremus Industries. The Ether. The vanity press. Zombie Einstein. Carl Sagan. Water witching.
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Transcript
Jeff:
Hey everybody, and welcome to the Jeff and Casey show.
Casey:
Hello, and welcome to the Jeff and Casey show. Our special 12 days of Christmas, 12 days of podcast, if you will. Are we gonna call it 12 days of podcast? What are we calling this?
Jeff:
The 12 Days of Podcast.
Casey:
The 12 Days of Podcast.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
We are on day 9. The 9 ladies dancing.
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
And today, we have been sitting on some really hot material, which we are ready to whip out, so to speak.
Jeff:
We know that a common gift for the holidays is a book.
Casey:
Literature.
Jeff:
Literature.
Casey:
Great literature.
Jeff:
Because you’re traveling and you might get somebody a book so they have something to read on the plane.
Casey:
The readers on your list. It’s educational sometimes.
Jeff:
Yeah, so we have a couple days of books.
Casey:
It’s literary.
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
It’s mentally stimulating.
Jeff:
And I thought we’d cover 2 books, and we’ll cover the first one today.
Casey:
Yes. And if you will, you will remember that we have always been a champion of literacy.
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
Here on the podcast we have previously brought you Jeff’s readings from Ian and Christie. Some fabulous Van Halen and Heavy Metal minutes, where you got a taste of literature there. And we also had, didn’t we have The Church Flyer? We’ve had some wonderful pieces of literature.
Jeff:
Brought us all together.
Casey:
That brought us all together. And now, Jeff has found another Gem.
Jeff:
Yes, and this book was brought to our attention by Dan, one of the guys that worked here at RAD, and he attained this book I don’t know where, because you immediately had to get one for yourself.
Casey:
As soon as I knew about it I had to get one for myself, yes.
Jeff:
And that was a hard one to get.
Casey:
It was very hard to find.
Jeff:
These are in short supply.
Casey:
This book will cost you 50 dollars, even though it’s worth about 25 cents.
Jeff:
It will cost you 50 dollars and it’s worth it. (pause)
Jeff:
Now, the first clue that something is wacky, is his name is David Cornelius. . .what do you. . .what do you call this. . .
Casey:
I don’t know how to pronounce this, it’s David Cornelius Doraymus, D. . .Doremus. . .
Jeff:
It’s published by Doremus industries. Hmm.
Casey:
A little suspicious.
Jeff:
A little suspicious.
Casey:
Vanity press? Could be.
Jeff:
Maybe. At first glance. . .
Casey:
It could be some unrelated Doremus. . .
Jeff:
Probably. . .
Casey:
Probably an unrelated Doremus.
Jeff:
Let’s not judge.
Casey:
Right, it’s like, if you know, Reginald T. Houghton. is published by Houghton-Mifflin, I’m not immediately gonna go to the fact that it’s the same Houghton, could be another Houghton.
Jeff:
Now what this book is, and Dan left this on my desk.
Casey:
Much like he did the porn flyer.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
The porn and pumpkins church flyer, yeah.
Jeff:
Without saying anything. . .
Casey:
Much the same thing.
Jeff:
Letting me explore the insanity that which is his book called “Cracking the Universe.”
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Now this is a revolutionary explanation of all forces that act on everything from quarks to atoms, to galaxies and universes, and outstanding exploration.
Casey:
Now, you can think of this just to give you an idea of the kind of book that this is. If you’ve ever seen one of those Carl Sagan books where he explains physics to the layman. Imagine a book that’s like that, except everything in it is wrong.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
That’s basically where we’re at.
Jeff:
Imagine that person is clinically insane and you have this book. Now, the first thing he points out. . .
Casey:
Well let me also give one other piece of. . .right. . .cause in those Carl Sagan books, to my knowledge when they do have color plates in them, none of the color plates are a family portrait of Carl Sagan’s family.
Jeff:
Yeah, right.
Casey:
This book not so. Turns out. . .
Jeff:
Let’s just so you some stuff.
Casey:
Here’s a family portrait, not necessarily scientific. Here we are, just in case you were wondering what I looked like. . .and my kids. . .and my wife.
Jeff:
Because you’re going to need those, when he becomes so famous. . .
Casey:
For posterity. Smithsonian, etc. . .
Jeff:
So he has an introduction where he talks about all of his big concept. . .
Casey:
Unified field theory kind of a thing.
Jeff:
Unified theory of everything, which brings gravitational in, and he explains
Casey:
And thank God somebody finally did it, Jeff. Because they’ve been working on it for awhile.
Jeff:
It’s true. He explains that we’ve missed on thing.
Casey:
Oh.
Jeff:
We’ve known about matter state. We do, according to him. We know about the energy state.
Casey:
Ok, so you’re talking about e=mc squared, we know about the m and the e, if you will.
Jeff:
Now there is one variable I had never seen in that formula.
Casey:
OK, well probably because Einstein got it wrong, I’m guessing.
Jeff:
Sure. Of course.
Casey:
Way to go, Einstein.
Jeff:
We’re missing the zip state.
Casey:
Oh, so there is a z in there.
Jeff:
Yeah, there is a z, I don’t remember it precisely I don’t know.
Casey:
It’s in there somewhere.
Jeff:
Maybe that 2 was really a z. . .
Casey:
Oh so maybe it’s e=mz squared. . .
Jeff:
Yeah. Exactly. Well I was thinking m=mcz.
Casey:
Why not raise the speed of light to an arbitrary power. Sounds like a plan.
Jeff:
Right, so he talks a lot about how this works. But in the introduction, he takes the time to first set the record straight about this very far forward looking book that’s going to change everything.
Casey:
Which is the book you are holding in your hand that he wrote, and published. . .
Jeff:
Right, and cost 50 dollars. It says I’m told by scholars that the 2nd book of the Jewish Talmud?
Casey:
Talmud, yeah.
Jeff:
Bringing it all in to the Christmas thing.
Casey:
Yeah, except the Jews don’t celebrate Christmas, but good job.
Jeff:
And this was left out of the Christian Old Testament. . .
Casey:
Ahh conspiracy theory, huh?
Jeff:
Right, but the 2nd book. . .
Casey:
Like the DaVinci Code.
Jeff:
Yeah exactly, but it attributes to God to have said “I have only partially created the world, it is yours to finish.” An interesting quote.
Casey:
Yeah, yeah.
Jeff:
He goes on to say, now if in some small way I can contribute to the tomorrows of all Homo-Sapiens, then I will risk this ridicule. Right?
Casey:
Ok, so he’s basically saying I’m putting my neck on the line, like many greats before me, earth revolves around the sun what?
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
It’s like, sticking his neck out there, he’s like the guillotine of public opinion, let it falleth on my neck, I am prepared for that eventuality because I am going down for my cause.
Jeff:
I will risk the ridicule. Further, should I be wrong, then perhaps someone else can explain to me why gravity works.
Casey:
(Laughter)
Jeff:
You know, he had it going there and he kind of in that last sentence lost it.
Casey:
Right he was all ready to be humble, and then he was like a total cock at the end of it.
Jeff:
Yeah at the end of it he was like, look, why don’t you write your own fucking book if you understand how it works. I don’t see anyone else coming up with zip state.
Casey:
All these armchair physicists, right? Welcome to the glass house you stone thrower. How do you think gravity works, mother fucker? I didn’t think so.
Jeff:
So if I could explain zip state in a short thing.
Casey:
You know what it is?
Jeff:
I can only give you the generalities. Reading this book is mind-bending, ok? It is down the rabbit hole. So, zip state, everything in his theory has crazy parallels to stuff that exists otherwise. Matter is rock. Energy is light. If zip state has some corollary it’s basically cum, right? His theory has so much ejections, down whirlpools, into electron mouths, in a vortex of the electron throat.
Casey:
So you’re basically saying that it’s something like, ok, once a month or so the nucleus travels down the zip tube and may or may not implant itself in the energy lining, that kind of a thing?
Jeff:
Every kind of action that he describes in this book is vaguely sexual. He brings it. Now, most of this is so crazy to read, and I’ll try to do my best here.
Casey:
Do you need some help?
Jeff:
No, I might give you a different one I think. But I want to talk about first off a little bit, the explosiveness of the situation.
Casey:
Just how energy packed this zip state is?
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
Because when I hear zip I’m still thinking the magnetic media from nineteen nineties, the early nineties.
Jeff:
OK, So there’s something called cyclonic legs.
Casey:
Right, so it’s kind of like after you’ve had a cyclonic irrigation.
Jeff:
Right. The cyclonic legs overcome this problem by rope braiding their cyclonic necks about themselves, each reinforces each other. The cavitation zone boundary, or unigy boundary, of one cyclonic throat, will help hold the cyclonic throat of its sister cyclonic swirls together.
Casey:
OK, you know the throats are female.
Jeff:
But at the same time, similar swirl directions create a chafe conflict-ion at the rim of conflict.
Casey:
The rim of conflict!
Jeff:
Yeah there’s some chaffing at the rim, basically.
Casey:
(Laughing)
Jeff:
Stop it or I’m not going to get through this.
Casey:
OK, sorry.
Jeff:
Fuck I lost my place. Chaffing conflict-ion at the rim of the point of contact between the same spin direction cyclonic leg cavitations.
Casey:
The throats that are all wound together, there’s a contact rim that the throat is coming into conflict with, and there’s chaffing there.
Jeff:
This acts as a governor of the spin rate any leg can achieve in excess of the spin rate of the other legs. You can’t go too fast to your left. . .
Casey:
Of course not makes perfect sense.
Jeff:
This chafe condition in a proton is mediated by the neutron counter-directional turns. It’s kind of like a three way, right?
Casey:
Sort of.
Jeff:
No matter how strong the force, the strong nuclear force, of the legs rope-braiding about themselves, if the diameter of the neck keeps decreasing, and the spin speed keeps increasing, they will reach a spin rate at which the rope braid can no longer maintain the integrity of the cyclonic swirl. When this point is reached, the high speed end of the nucleus which is spinning too fast to remain contained will explode, and will go swimming off as a zip particle. Carrying with it it’s own cavitation. . .
Casey:
(laughing) He said swimming! It swims off!
Jeff:
Stop it. Carrying its own cavitation unity. Zip particles do not consume energy state and therefore have no mass. They can be swallowed.
Casey:
OK, just to be clear on this, for example, does one of these zip particles only last for say, a few hours outside of the nucleus, or what?
Jeff:
Probably, less in a Kleenex.
Casey:
OK.
Jeff:
He goes on to say, he doesn’t have all the answers, so he goes on to say, I don’t think the zip explosively breaks its integrity with the cyclonic swirl. The action is more like a hyper-fast corkscrewing.
Casey:
Oh, so you’re working it.
Jeff:
Like our clit and corkscrew. Once a zip quantum detaches, you know, retracts, the leg swirl will rebound a bit, sufficient to offset the kinetic energy state in rushing in to the opposite open cyclonic swirl end.
Casey:
So basically you’re pulling out of one cyclonic swirl end, and going in to one close by but not the same one.
Jeff:
Right, the opposite, but still. You know, you’ve retracted from one swirl and gone into another swirl. A neighbor swirl.
Casey:
The exactly.
Jeff:
The zip particle will then swim through its own cavitation unity at the speed that zip swims through the energy state that at the current energy state background. . .
Casey:
Makes perfect sense.
Jeff:
I believe this is a much faster swim rate than electromagnetic waves which are explosively shot through the energy state.
Casey:
OK, so in one case it’s a gentle release, and in another it’s an explosive shot.
Jeff:
Right in one swirl, it’s like gentle, and you reach some sort of mutual energy state. In another one, you are so excited to be in a swirl you normally not in. . .
Casey:
It’s like fuck what am I doing what am I doing I explosively shot all over. . .
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
OK it all makes sense. I have a question though, Jeff. So what I like about this, is that I think it takes a special brand of crazy to go from imagining you have all these answers that you totally don’t have at all. You’re imagining this in your head. Going from that to also imagining that you don’t quite understand it all. He’s like I believe this. . .like. . .you fucking made it up, you don’t have to believe anything you can just know. But it’s part of the delusion, it’s he is so delusional that he’s actually imagined a thing he doesn’t himself totally understand.
Jeff:
It also sells it better to other people.
Casey:
Right. . .
Jeff:
If he knew everything it can’t be true.
Casey:
This stuff is complicated I’ve only worked out some of it.
Jeff:
So here’s a picture of the swirl. And there’s the electron mouth and everything. There’s a lot of diagrams.
Casey:
Those are crazy diagrams, Jesus Christ.
Jeff:
There’s a picture of his family.
Casey:
Yep I liked that picture, I remember that, that’s why I was bringing that up.
Jeff:
OK, I’d like you to start there, this paragraph with “Enter Albert Einstein,” and I want you to read up to this footnote, and then I want you to read the foot note.
Casey:
I can do all of that.
Jeff:
OK this is Casey, taking over.
Casey:
Now I haven’t read this passage before so you’ll have to excuse me if I make any mistakes. Enter Albert Einstein, a German physicist with his special theory of relativity propounded in 1905. He suggested that light traveled through space in quantum form as photons and that they had properties of particles as well as waves. Since light packets could be understood as separate little packages without the necessity of waves which needed a medium to travel through, it was now conceivable that the universe did not need a background ether, and either was officially dead and buried.
Jeff:
He killed the ether.
Casey:
Now the footnote that you asked me to read is footnote twenty-one. Having never undertaken any university chemistry or physics courses, I did not know of ether or its demise. At least he’s being upfront.
Jeff:
Yeah he’s like well you know what? I did dip in to something that’s based in reality here, and let’s be honest here I don’t know what the fuck that is because I don’t live in reality much of the time.
Casey:
My only structured schooling in the physical sciences was in high school where I got a C in chemistry and a D in physics and understood little of what was being taught. A trend which continues to this day, I might add. That isn’t in the text, I’m filling it in.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
My introduction to ether was when I supposed that something, not nothing, existed in the interstitial inner spaces in the atom. Only later did I learn that ether was the standard model until Michelsen Morley disproved its existence in 1897. Isaac Newton believed in ether, as did the ancient Greeks. So much for my new discovery.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
Now I have a question actually. Is he bringing ether back? Or is he saying no, it’s still dead. What’s happening there exactly?
Jeff:
Right, he is saying, Einstein was brilliant. If alive today and sentient, I don’t know because if brought back alive. . .
Casey:
He doesn’t want zombie Einstein. . .
Jeff:
He doesn’t want zombie Einstein, it’s like hey can you explain this (zombie impression)
Casey:
(zombie voice) God doesn’t play dice.
Jeff:
He would easily pick up all these pieces and put them in to the energy state theory. For that matter, almost any scientist alive today could put the pieces together were it not for the ingrained basis of the scientific community which knows for a certainty that there is only matter and waves and that ether does not exist.
Casey:
So basically what he’s trying to say there, if I may, is like only if Einstein were alive today, he’d have a backer. Einstein would be on his side, and the only reason that Einstein, you know one of our great scientists, isn’t right there championing this zipjackulation theory he has there, is because he’s dead. And the only way we can bring him back is as a zombie, which is no good to him.
Jeff:
If for no other reason, I hope the existence of the energy state is soon experimentally demonstrated just to open the minds of young people to the concept that all they have been taught is not necessarily true. Just because it is universally believed doesn’t make it so. It’s not important that the energy state is proved, or disproved, or swallowed or spit. He doesn’t care, what he’s saying is that it’s more important that he demonstrate a philosophy of not necessarily believing what you are told. He goes on to say in another little footnote, formal schooling teaches students not to think or to conceptualize.
Casey:
Well it doesn’t teach them very well, since he got a C and a D apparently but yeah.
Jeff:
Teachers should first teach a love for ideas, no matter how crazy. . .
Casey:
Right, a love for certain ideas, certain ridiculous ideas. . .
Jeff:
Two standard courses that should be given to all students are creative thinking and writing probably.
Casey:
Presumably. . .
Jeff:
So that children may learn to voyage about their minds. . .and. . .map reading.
Casey:
Woah. So I was with him there, I was like, yeah I think creative thinking should be taught in schools, that would be a great idea. Map reading. . .I’m not so sure about that one. Why map reading?
Jeff:
So they can learn to voyage about a city or country.
Casey:
What the fuck?
Jeff:
I think he was just writing and was like, you know what, that one time I got fucking lost in New York City, I didn’t have my map.
Casey:
Why didn’t they teach me this in school?
Jeff:
I failed map reading along with physics, this fucking sucks, in my next book I’m going to make sure that one of the courses that is taught is map reading.
Casey:
But also, they’re opposites. Like in one case he’s arguing that he wants students not to follow a map. Be creative, think outside the box, do other shit. Then he’s like, and I want them to follow an exact path that someone drew on a piece of paper.
Jeff:
So at the end of the book, he has a chapter called The Epilogue of God.
Casey:
I like the sound of that.
Jeff:
It describes a whole bunch of stuff and God is in the zip state.
Casey:
Oh I’m sure he is.
Jeff:
There’s another little short paragraph about. . .
Casey:
I found God in the zip state.
Jeff:
Yeah and he talks about, yeah there’s a lot of stuff about God is in the zip state, and a whole bunch of them, in the beginning, well at least after the creation of the energy state, which I prefer to think of as the cytoplasm of God. Again like, which I imagine. . .
Casey:
When God impregnated the universe.
Jeff:
The little swimmers of God.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
He then has an appendix on Einstein’s rail car, you know the famous thought experiment.
Casey:
On the 6th day, he finished off, and on the 7th day he fell asleep.
Jeff:
. . .and came everywhere (simulates cumming). . .
Casey:
No on the 7th day he fell asleep, he was done. He was like, I’m done.
Jeff:
Business time is over baby. OK so appendix one was about Einstein’s. . .
Casey:
Juice.
Jeff:
No, about his rail car experiment. Appendix two: Book about physics, diagrams, stars, nebulae, and then to. . .water witching.
Casey:
OK, that was the appendix, I was wondering where that was. I remember that.
Jeff:
First sentence: You may not believe in water witching but it works.
Casey:
Now, can you take a moment to explain what water witching is because I don’t know if the listeners know, because I didn’t know.
Jeff:
So, it is the ability, you’re gonna dig a well, and there are little blocks of water in the water table that are higher and lower in other places in the ground.
Casey:
So you’re trying to find a high one.
Jeff:
So you hire these water witchers which have this divining rod, which can be a stick or a piece of metal or whatever.
Casey:
Bullshit, basically.
Jeff:
They walk around and shake the stick, where it wiggles the most is where the water is nearest. So you can dig a well there cheap.
Casey:
Right so where it’s highest.
Jeff:
Yeah. That’s what they do. They’ve been around for a long time.
Casey:
It’s all complete bullshit.
Jeff:
It’s so crazy it’s not even on the. . .
Casey:
I imagine the Amazing Randi has already taken care of that a long time ago.
Jeff:
Now why this has anything to do with the zip state. . .
Casey:
He put it in the appendix, he knows it’s a little off track.
Jeff:
Map reading, and water witching. I don’t know if I’m ever going to get to book 2, he talks about book 2, he gives you a preview like, next on my insane. . .
Casey:
But he never published book 2, right?
Jeff:
I don’t know if he ever published book 2.
Casey:
Well I looked when I bought this book there was only one book authored by him, so if he did no one has a copy.
Jeff:
Most people won’t believe it’s possible and conjure up witchcraft or ouija board parlor tricks. If you doubt water witching will work, bring a wallet with lots of cash for the wager I’m going to make you and I will make a believer out of you. I need to identify the process by which water witching works kept bringing me back to the energy state flow.
Casey:
So it’s not as disconnected as you thought, Jeff.
Jeff:
Somehow it has to be related based upon my premise that the energy state will alter it’s course somewhat to avoid the dense objects, to a variation of the thing that gravity above water is stronger than gravity above mountains, and that golf balls always break to the ocean.
Casey:
I’m sorry, I’m sorry, golf balls always break to the ocean.
Jeff:
Golf balls always break to the ocean.
Casey:
I’ve never heard that before.
Jeff:
On putting greens in Hawaii, not everywhere just Hawaii because there is water all around.
Casey:
The fuck is wrong with this guy, Jeff.
Jeff:
He took a vacation to Hawaii, got lost, he made sure he got map reading down in his notes. Then he’s like, I’m always missing golf balls toward the ocean.
Casey:
Maybe cause it’s an island, so whichever way the golf ball breaks, it’s toward the ocean. God-fucking-damn this guy.
Jeff:
OK. Although my equipment was outside in the wind, and my magnetic detection equipment was not highly sophisticated, I’m fairly certain that whatever force is acting on the rods, it was not because of electron flows, magnetics or wind.
Casey:
(laughs)
Jeff:
Puzzled, I concluded that the force is one of inner ear response.
Casey:
Wait what does that have to do with zip state?
Jeff:
Well the inner ear response is moving the stick somehow, OK? The energy state flow exhibits a minor surface flow variation above the anomaly. Over the anomaly there is a higher concentration of energy state in rush. While minor, it is detectable with a grabometer as used by geologists to detect subsurface anomalies, gravity variations. I believe our inner ear somehow work in unison with each other. Walking sideways in to a zone did not produce any noticeable swings.
Casey:
Oh so they have to be perpendicular to the direction of travel.
Jeff:
So here is what he said to prove his theory. I do not believe there are any witchers that have only one inner ear.
Casey:
That’s a pretty safe fucking bet.
Jeff:
Maybe the front of the inner ear senses a lesser force than being exerted on the back of the inner ear. He’s guessing here.
Casey:
Again, he’s hypothesizing about his own fucked up imaginary world.
Jeff:
He doesn’t have all the answers.
Casey:
It’s amazing that someone can imagine missing information in his imaginary information. His imagination is so complete it imagines holes in its own self. Normally like you know what? It’s a unicorn. I’m like, what do unicorns shit? They shit rainbows. It’s my unicorn, I made it up, it shits whatever I say. Not like, that’s a good question, what do unicorns shit? I suppose. . .and it’s just like, what?
Jeff:
It’s awesome. This gravity sense organ may be more sensitive than previously thought. A witcher senses gravity differential, and the mind, unaware of the difference, somehow causes witchers to position their hands differently over the anomaly. So some must be more sensitive to gravity than others. Those that are less sensitive, can’t witch, those that are more sensitive, witch very well. And the most sensitive people, can even get a deflection with a tree branch instead of wires. A forked branch, a rotation of the wrist in which the thumbs move forward will result in the downward dipping of the branch. New paragraph.
Casey:
This is amazing.
Jeff:
I believe the mystery of witching is now resolved. Even though he has questions in his own. . .this is. . .he resolves in a page and a half. He has questions but it is resolved. . .
Casey:
You know what I will say about that, Jeff. Is that I listened to a lunch time lecture by one of the dudes, a Japanese researcher, who led the laboratory that discovered how the immune system works. Not as important as the zip state theory, but still, an important scientific discovery anyone will agree, but not perhaps of the magnitude of this Doremus fellow. So he said, much like in there, was after solving the problem of how the immune system worked, he decided to go work on neurology instead. What he said was that yes, there are plenty of unanswered questions about the immune system, but most of them are practical. I was only interested in solving the basic underlying theory of the functioning immune system, and I don’t think I have anything particular to add here. So I’m going to go work on the solving the basic theoretical underpinnings of neurology, which are now very poorly understood.
Jeff:
Right, going to shock some monkeys.
Casey:
So I feel like he’s making a similar statement. It’s the inner ear. I’ve given you basically the idea. There’s years of research to be done here, I’m fine with that, you can do it in a wing named after me in your institution. Whatever needs to happen, let’s let that happen, but I don’t think I need to spend my time on that right now because there is zip shit to do over here, I’m going to work on that.
Jeff:
I’ve got some serious (grunt) zipping to do.
Casey:
I’ve got a zip neutron release, I’m over due, I’ve got blue zips right now. . .
Jeff:
He does have a lot of kids. I think that zip state is unconstrained most of the time. What is it 6 kids? 5 kids, oh boy.
Casey:
So he’s zipped several times in the past decade.
Jeff:
You wouldn’t think just based on that, that’s the face of madness. He just looks like kind of a mormon, family man, just sitting there with his wife and all of his kids. Then it’d be like you sit down with him at a party and you’re like, what do you do? And he’s like, I invented the zip shit and I’m going to ejaculate in your salad, let’s go, let’s do this. And you’d be like, I can’t get out of here, why did I talk to this guy? There you go, that is our science day. . .
Casey:
The nine ladies of science dancing, here on the ninth day of our twelve days of podcast.
Jeff:
Those are pages, I did not read the book, because it’s just. . .
Casey:
How could you? You would go insane.
Jeff:
I think you’d fall in to it.
Casey:
You would end up where he was at mentally.
Jeff:
Yes like with the mad hatter, and drinking opium and like, blowing out your ejection. . .
Casey:
The corkscrew. . .surface. . .rim job whatever he was talking about all over the place. . .
Jeff:
It’s a great gift for the science friend if you can find it. . .
Casey:
Hours, it’s the gift that keeps on giving.
Jeff:
I didn’t even read some of the hysterical, convoluted, like there are sentences where not a single noun makes sense after another verb. It’s just bananas just spewing like. . .the guys the write notebooks, like graphophiliacs, where they just write. . .it’s like that published by his company.
Casey:
Right, Doremus industries.
Jeff:
It’s awesome. Alright guys, that is day. . .what day was that?
Casey:
We are on day nine.
Jeff:
Day nine.
Casey:
Tomorrow, day ten, ten lords a-leaping. We have a very special treat for you tomorrow so tune in.
Jeff:
And we will see you then.
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casey muratori
the jeff and casey show - season 2 - episode 35
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