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The Technician
No Imperfections Noted
The Jeff and Casey Show
Jeff and Casey Time
Casey Muratori
Seattle, WA
The Dystopian Future is Now
"Can you imagine the crosswalk system we'd have if the TSA was involved?"
Original air date: July 24th, 2009
Topics. Security. Rubbage. Smoking. The dystopian present. Bose. Lost luggage. Airport food. Popeye’s Chicken. Closed economies. Shania Twain. KFC. Duty-free.
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Transcript
Casey:
Hey, everybody! Welcome to the Jeff and Casey Show.
Jeff:
Welcome to the Jeff and Casey Show.
Casey:
I don’t want to change the batters [sp]. I like that better.
Jeff:
I know. That’s amazing play [?] time.
Casey:
I’m going to play that to the beginning of that one.
Jeff:
All right.
Casey:
It’s good actually.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
So here I’m talking about something specific.
Jeff:
What do you want to talk about?
Casey:
It’s not even linked from our listeners.
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
Or our mighty listeners.
Jeff:
You’re just going rogue on this one.
Casey:
I’m going rogue.
Jeff:
Okay. I’m with you.
Casey:
Okay. What’s the deal at the airport? You’ve seen these stands.
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
They’re selling Bose headphones, right?
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
Those headphones that you were there —
Jeff:
The noise cancelling — the active noise cancelling headphones?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
What’s the deal with --?
Casey:
They have a little stand. Yeah.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
So my question is, and people buy them.
Jeff:
Yes, they do.
Casey:
They actually buy them.
Jeff:
I see they love wearing this.
Casey:
They’re worth $300.
Jeff:
They’re expensive.
Casey:
Now, consumer reports, home theatre magazine, several publications that I read —
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
Have come out and said these aren’t just the same as the 29-dollar Sony’s.
Jeff:
They’re worse.
Casey:
Although they’re the same ones, they’ve changed the label, right?
Jeff:
Oh, you mean there’s actually like the same plan in China is making the -- and they either stamp Bose on and sell them for $300. . .
Casey:
Or Sony or whatever.
Jeff:
Or Sony — they sell them for $30.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
My question is this…
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
Everybody goes to the airport.
Jeff:
That’s right.
Casey:
And he’s outraged, like when they buy a Coke for $10.
Jeff:
That’s right.
Casey:
Or a meal for this.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
No one after those meals comes to you and says, “Casey, you know what? I know you’re like the palace kitchen. . .”
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
“ But have you ever eaten at the O’ Flannery’s [sp] at the airport?” Right?
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
“It’s $50 a plate, but it is worth it, Casey.”
Jeff:
Soup in a cup.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Styrofoam cup.
Casey:
Right. So, people won’t do that for food. They won’t do that for. . . Everything in the [expletive] airport is a rip off.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
From the moment you get into the airport. . .
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
You’re going to be raped.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
The entire time. . . That’s right.
Casey:
Until you’re right at your destination, all the way up and including the rental car.
Jeff:
There are a few things here. There are so many You’ve brought up a topic, “just the ”airport“ quote and quote?
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Is like a topic that you could talk about for hours?
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Without hitting all of the important things that are ridiculous about it?
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Right?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
And in my mind, the airport is very much like the last bastion of closed economy kind of a system that we have here in the US, right?
Casey:
Right. Okay, right.
Jeff:
I mean, maybe not like you consider Las Vegas to be a similar sort of the thing, right?
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
A place where like none of the standard rules apply because we’ve created this artificial zone that people actually cannot physically leave —
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
After they enter it.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Right? It’s not possible for them to do so.
Casey:
Right. The friction is so high.
Jeff:
The friction is so high, right?
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
It’s like they’ve gone to have to go on this flight.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
They have to get there really wetter [?]. All right, so here’s the thing, First of all, I know what the deals of these Bose noise cancelling headsets. I know why the noise cancelling headphones are so popular.
Casey:
That worth? Okay.
Jeff:
I have noise cancelling headphones.
Casey:
Yes?
Jeff:
That are awesome, they’re eudemonics [sp]. They’re passing.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
You just put them in, you can hear anything and it’s perfect.
Casey:
Okay?
Jeff:
The problem with that is it’s perfect. You can’t hear any outside noise and you hear the stuff you’re playing crystal clear.
Casey:
Right?
Jeff:
It doesn’t sound like the headphones are doing anything at all. . .
Casey:
I see.
Jeff:
Because it’s just perfect.
Casey:
I see.
Jeff:
The Bose ones when you put them on and trend them on, it’s like [imitating booming sound]
Casey:
[imitating statics]
Jeff:
But it sounds like it’s really working really, really hard.
Casey:
I see.
Jeff:
Right? It’s like if you wanted to make my eudemonics be more popular with like with the crowd of the airport, you should make it look like [imitating beeping sound].
Casey:
Ah, okay.
Jeff:
Active noise cancelling enabling now. [laughter]
Jeff:
And then if you like this is awesome. This is really awesome.
Casey:
That’s a totally different way I was going with.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
I was going with the total cognitive dissonance thing where it’s like. . .
Jeff:
I mustn’t go and pay $300.
Casey:
I’ve been [expletive]
Jeff:
I patronize my [xx].
Casey:
And I want to make sure. . . If everyone else is [expletive], then that’s almost as if I didn’t get [expletive], right? That’s where I kind of figure. . .
Jeff:
No, I…
Casey:
It was a psychological thing going on.
Jeff:
No. I think they’re actively. . . Well, it’s part of it, right? The $300 price tag is pretty well clearly, if the electronics necessary to do this [expletive] level of noise cancellation that I’m listening to is $300, it must be very advanced.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
And this is the best it could possibly do under these circumstances.
Casey:
That’s what I was thinking. That’s the cognitive dissonance part of what. . .
Jeff:
And I think is totally true.
Casey:
Okay.
Jeff:
Right? But again, part of this is if they work better, it might be less as like well, it doesn’t even sound like it’s doing anything. It’s just quiet.
Casey:
Yeah. Yeah.
Jeff:
Like what tells to [?] that?
Casey:
Well, what’s supposed to have had?
Jeff:
I paid $300 for something that is quiet? I paid you $300 for nothing essentially?
Casey:
Exactly.
Jeff:
What’s the deal we’re at?
Casey:
The absence of everything else?
Jeff:
I wanted to sound like a big [?] something.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Yeah, exactly.
Casey:
Okay.
Jeff:
So, here are some other things that have to do with that. The people that are buying these 300-dollar Bose noise cancelling headphones. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
They are, inevitably, people who have like one CD and a CD player, and it’s like Mariah Carey. It’s like a 50 year old guy, right?
Casey:
Shania Twain?
Jeff:
He’s listening to Shania Twain.
Casey:
Right?
Jeff:
Yeah. It’s like somebody whose actual caring and perception of music does not warrant noise cancellation, right?
Casey:
I see. Unless it was applied to the music.
Jeff:
It doesn’t matter. [laughter]
Jeff:
Yes, exactly. [laughter]
Jeff:
If they sold headphones, they amplify the exterior and shut off what was coming out of your CD player, those what they worth $300 for you. [laughter]
Jeff:
Or if it came preloaded with good music, and when you plug it in and play that instead. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Also a plus. Here’s another thing. Those Bose headphones can run out of batteries.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Right? So, now, you actually ought to go to buy batteries —
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Like instead of the passive ones which has worked
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
You don’t have to do anything, right? They’re just like optically set. I mean, acoustically set up to not be a problem, right? So, now, you bought a $300 pair of headphones. . .
Casey:
That require. . .
Jeff:
That doesn’t work very well. You have to remember to buy batteries. And they could just run out in the middle of your plane flight. Right?
Casey:
Yeah. And you have to turn them off for good portions of the play.
Jeff:
That’s right. You need to remember to like turn them on or off or what the [expletive]. Anyway, here’s another thing. This will be like the awesomest thing if you get this. It’s if they sold the Bose headphones duty free. That’s the thing that I love. It’s like duty free.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
People will buy [expletive] the fave [?] would never buy.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Under any circumstances that they don’t need or don’t want.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
But it’s duty free.
Casey:
Right. Well, they’re thinking that duty is like this incredible hat.
Jeff:
It’s shoot.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
It’s like 300% of the purchase price.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
It’s like I got this essentially for free and I didn’t have to pay for this.
Casey:
Yeah. You don’t understand.
Jeff:
Yeah, you don’t understand.
Casey:
That this costs $300.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
But I saved $300 which means they didn’t cost anything.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
And you understand that duty’s a quarter and one percent.
Jeff:
I guarantee you much like the noise cancelling headphones are not used for anyone to listen to anything that is any good anyway. I guarantee you the people shopping to duty free shop have no idea what duty is.
Casey:
Yeah. Who collect it, how much it is, why it is imposed, or whether or not the price there is getting even actually reflects a removal of duty in the first place.
Casey:
Right. I like the fact that they go in and they buy like 20 cartons of cigarettes, right?
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
To get out of the duty.
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
And they’re going to carry those all the way along. Maybe they just get them to go in the little smoke boxes. You know the smoke boxes they have in the airport?
Jeff:
[laughs] Yes.
Casey:
I just feel bad for the people in them.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
‘Cause I mean. . . okay, they are addicted to this thing.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
You put them all together to amplify the ill effects. . .
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
Of their habit. It’s kind of like you know what?
Jeff:
It’s like forcing you to drink alcohol at a bar. It’s like. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Yeah. That’s where they would rather prefer it to get.
Casey:
Or it’s like pushing all the paedophiles into a group and then putting them next to a girl scout facility. Right?
Jeff:
No, it’s not. How is it like that at all? It’s not an all like that?
Casey:
No, it’s exactly like that.
Jeff:
No, it isn’t because it’s more like giving them a bunch of girl scouts and putting them in a room. It’s like “It is fine if you go ahead and sexually abuse the girl scouts as long as they’re in this little room.
Casey:
Right. Exactly like that.
Jeff:
That’s very different than putting a new. . .
Casey:
Oh, I see.
Jeff:
You’re in a. . . I’ll [xx] they put in your. . . as a cigarette dispenser.
Casey:
Oh, okay, I see. You own a big glass.
Jeff:
But you can’t get to it or something.
Casey:
Oh okay. That is even worse.
Jeff:
It’s something like that.
Casey:
Okay. I see.
Jeff:
It’s like “Here, we’re putting you in a room with all the girl scouts.” It’s like “You know what, paedophiles, guide your 3D [?] service. you got to go teach kindergarten”.
Casey:
Right. [laughter]
Jeff:
Right? That’s more what it’s like. Right? It’s like if not . . .
Casey:
Community service.
Jeff:
That’s not all what it’s like. . .
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
Yeah
Casey:
Oh my gosh! See, I feel bad for those people.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
I think the other thing is the airport’s getting to be more and more just. . . It’s just another mall.
Jeff:
It’s a mall.
Casey:
Like the. . .
Jeff:
But you can’t leave. It’s a mall you can’t leave.
Casey:
The Atlanta one is a mall. There are brick stones. There are sharper images.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
It’s just like “Hey, walk there on the wall.”
Jeff:
Well Seattle was that way too. They keep upgrading it to do that, right? Well, this is another thing too, right? It’s one of those of ridiculousnesses, which is that once you create a scenario that’s kind of artificial like that . . .
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
And it turns out to be beneficial for some people you’re stuck with it forever, right?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
It’s like why is there airport security, right?
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Who knows?
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Why is there no security for a train? Why can you walk under a train with like ten tons of C-4 in a suit case and no one gives a [expletive]?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
But you go to the airport with shaving cream. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
And they’re like. . . you might stride the role [?]. Why is that? It’s like, well now, there’s no incentive for them to not do it.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
It’s like. . .
Casey:
Well, more importantly, there’s somebody that’s going to lobby against it or forever and ever and ever. Right.
Jeff:
There are people who are making money screening your [expletive].
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
There is people making money by the fact that you can’t get through the airport conveniently, right?
Casey:
They’re unionized.
Jeff:
The duty free shop, the [expletive] babam pan [sp] they’re selling you for $80.
Casey:
That’s — I mean, there’s probably the only conservative view point that can hold any water. It’s not that like adding government is not going to help the people that you try to help originally.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
It’s the fact that once you have it, you never get rid of it. And if you keep acquitting government like that, it never ends. And it nets through to the extent.
Jeff:
What are you talking about? There’s no government involved here. TSA’s a private organization.
Casey:
Well, part of it. . . It isn’t part of it, is it? The TSA like there are two parts of the TSA. There’s the civilian part of it which is now unionized [?]. That’s all set up.
Jeff:
Sir. Great, even better.
Casey:
And then there’s a second. . .
Jeff:
I’m sorry. I can’t check your photo ID because that guy over there checks the photo ID.
Casey:
But usually at every TSA counter, there’s one guy who’s actually a federal employee. So, there’s usually like, out of 12, there’s one guy who’s in charge of like running that thing. It used to OB [sp] federal people but then they’ve quickly realized, “Okay, this is out of control”, and then, brought on ban.
Jeff:
Oh, and now it’s not out of control at all?
Casey:
I — it’s ridiculous. It’s I…
Jeff:
What are you talking about? No, it’s just like “Oh, we pay somebody else to be out of control.”
Casey:
Yeah, it’s pretty ridiculous.
Jeff:
It’s very ridiculous.
Casey:
And we’ve got used to it too. I was thinking about that when I flew this last weekend. It’s like how used to I’ve become of taking off my belt, my shoes, my jacket, I’m like, “Really? I’m going to be naked walking through this machine in another 20 years?” and I won’t give a crap. I would just like “Hey, party on, everybody.”
Jeff:
That’s the science fictions thing, right? Where they’re all like these retarded science fiction authors, which is all of them. They’re like they created dystopian future. It’s like — no, the dystopian future is now, right? [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
You take off your clothes to get on an airplane.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Do you have any idea. . . all those [expletive] voices that you hear in the crazy futuristic or whatever. . . It’s like they’re happening now. There’s a little thing going like “Please help us to help you. Have a safe. . .” I’d say, “You’re not helping me at all.”
Casey:
Oh, the way creepier ones are the ones that, and they do this for everything now which is even scarier, is they encourage you narking on other civilians for things like if you see anybody that’s suspicious. . .
Jeff:
Right. That’s right. Yes.
Casey:
Or if you see somebody litter. I heard the new littering ones that recently.
Jeff:
Yes. Case: If you see somebody in the HOV lane. . . The HOV lane is awesome because they have a number. If you see somebody in the HOV lane they don’t have enough people. . .
Jeff:
764-HERO
Casey:
Hero. Oh my [].
Jeff:
You too can be a hero.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
But I’m pointing some like this.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
It’s like “You know what. . .?”
Casey:
That should be cunt, right. [Jeff laughs]
Casey:
Which is you don’t want 800. I’m a busy body cunt.
Jeff:
764-NARK.
Casey:
Yeah, exactly.
Jeff:
Call 764-NARK and tell us about the other people who are in the HOV lane.
Casey:
Not the way it should go. Not the way it should go at all.
Jeff:
No, it’s not the way it should go.
Casey:
Okay, well, we have another link that we were going to talk about today, which was just awesome.
Jeff:
So, the part where I said we should do one link per show and you’re like “That’s a good idea.” You’re just [expletive] ignoring me.
Casey:
No. I was not ignoring you.
Jeff:
You’re just [expletive] ignoring me.
Casey:
Everything that we did so far was just like a smoke tangent.
Jeff:
That was a preparatory thing?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
That’s preparatory, was it?
Casey:
Yeah. It has to show.
Jeff:
How long have we gone?
Casey:
It’s throughout limit. [laughter]
Casey:
Don’t look at me like that. You participated in this awful waste of time. So, continue.
Jeff:
I have nothing to do with it.
Casey:
Go right into this, slick.
Jeff:
Nothing, nothing to do with it.
Casey:
So, I’m going to nail this link. That won’t matter. Everyone’s going to be interested in this link. They were about to talk about. . . They were not talking about it yet but this link is going to be amazing.
Jeff:
I still don’t even think we were done with the airport. I mean i. . .
Casey:
Do you still have more to go in the airport? Give me some more airport.
Jeff:
Well, it’s the. . .
Casey:
If you can stretch this for another 10 minutes, it’s a show. That’s the way to look at it.
Jeff:
Yeah, I’m saying pull it out. Pull it out, stretch it out.
Casey:
All right. Stretch it.
Jeff:
I mean we haven’t talked about half the [expletive] that happens at the airport?
Casey:
Okay.
Jeff:
So here’s the thing, right? They’re totally is super awesome about all the airport [expletive], right?
Casey:
All right?
Jeff:
It’s like this sort of mentality that anytime someone could be like sabotaging. . .
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
The airport or the security of the airport.
Casey:
Yeah. It was code orange all the way through my flights.
Jeff:
The whole time. It’s like I just don’t get it. It’s like look all around you, right? Imagine all the ways in which people could kill hundreds of thousands of people around you in your daily life.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
Why are you so concerned about it happening only at the airport? [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
They secure everything. They’re like, “Okay, look. We need to have a way to get the Coca Colas into the vending machine”, using some kind of a trusted security system
Casey:
Right, exactly.
Jeff:
So there’s not like who knows what could be smuggled into that. . .
Casey:
We can’t have some bottling places.
Jeff:
Biological agents in the Coca Cola.
Casey:
Yes, exactly.
Jeff:
Or it could be what people use with liquid explosives like, are you [expletive] kidding me? Have you ever been to a mall? Have you ever been to downtown Seattle? [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
There are tons of places where hundreds of thousands of people are around all of the time.
Casey:
That would be way easier.
Jeff:
Why is it the airport is the one that they’ve focused all these essentially on?
Casey:
Because it was the last. . .
Jeff:
Every door has an alarm on it.
Casey:
It was the last thing.
Jeff:
Go and get that door anywhere. They go outside. The door goes to the outside and that’s got an alarm. You’re leaving.
Casey:
That’s because they’re trying to fix what already happened, right?
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
It’s way harder to plan. . . I mean, really, that’s what we want, to be honest.
Jeff:
What?
Casey:
We want that. We want them totally focused on what’s already happened.
Jeff:
Who?
Casey:
Because if they’re forward-looking. . .
Jeff:
Oh [ ] knows.
Casey:
Oh my [ ]. Can you imagine the cross walk system we have?
Jeff:
Oh, yeah. Right.
Casey:
If the TSA was involved, right?
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
You could go to jail for crossing the street incorrectly.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
That’s what would happen because not only are you jay walking? You’re endangering others. . .
Jeff:
That’s right.
Casey:
With that jay walking, right?
Jeff:
Right. Somebody could in theory, run out in the middle of the street . . .
Casey:
And explode.
Jeff:
And explode. [laughter]
Casey:
We don’t know.
Jeff:
So, at every corner. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
What do you have to do first is you have to empty all your pockets, right?
Jeff:
Exactly. Right.
Jeff:
And to make sure that you won’t have anything in there that you could use to. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Say, for example, puncture a tire.
Casey:
Exactly.
Jeff:
All right? Something that could be thrown at a wind shield.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
At high velocity.
Casey:
Water balloons? You got to take those out.
Jeff:
You should have to put on metallic gloves that would prevent you from flipping the bird to somebody.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Just raising their blood pressure. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
And perhaps causing them to drive erratically. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Into the intersection. Yeah. Exactly.
Jeff:
Absolutely.
Casey:
For the children. They’d have pneumatic tubes to send your sheep cross [?] under the streets.
Jeff:
Yeah, exactly.
Casey:
Right? And there’d be a system under there.
Jeff:
You get them back from the other side of the street.
Casey:
Yes, right.
Jeff:
You get them back form the other side of the street for sure. Now, let’s not forget the cars. Because the cars are everybody’s dangerous.
Casey:
All right.
Jeff:
So, first of all, you don’t drive a car. Retired army tank plowits [sp] drive the cars.
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
Because we can trust them. They’re federal, it’s fine.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
They have those taxi cabs separators.
Jeff:
Yeah, exactly.
Casey:
They can’t get to the driver.
Jeff:
Yeah, exactly. You can’t get to them at all, right?
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
You’ll all board the car, and then, you wait for a while. . .
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
For like the central traffic control system. . .
Casey:
To let you on to the street.
Jeff:
To decide if It’s going to be okay. . .
Casey:
Yes.
Jeff:
For you to drive down the street, right? It’s like to spy [?]. It’s all right.
Casey:
You just can’t go.
Jeff:
Exactly.
Casey:
We might get grid lot [sp].
Jeff:
They’d champ [?] with the radio on at this point.
Casey:
No, we have to turn off all electronic devices.
Jeff:
You have to turn off all electronic devices, right? You have to make sure that the seats are not reclined.
Casey:
Turn your phone off.
Jeff:
You have to make sure the seatbelt is on and you do all of that [expletive].
Casey:
Yeah, right.
Jeff:
Obviously. Then, you can drive down the street.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
And that’s fine, right? When you finally get to your destination, you can get off. You can go. . . I don’t know, wait for the person. . . You can’t get your own bags out of the trunk. That’s why the other. . . You have to wait for somebody else to get them off.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
You take them there. And you could finally walk through your destination, I guess.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
If it becomes safe enough for you.
Casey:
Yeah, maybe. Yeah. You don’t know. So, no. The funny thing about this is everyone talks about like “Hey, let’s increase the temperature in the pot so that the frog doesn’t notice”, right?
Jeff:
Oh right. The slow, yeah.
Casey:
You know, we went from like zero to 200 degrees on 9 — 12.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
We were just like you know what? We’re turning this temperature up, Baby. They were talking about all the way there. It’s code orange. I don’t know what that is. Is that next to red?
Jeff:
I’m not . . . yeah.
Casey:
In what spectrum? Like, they should really say, “Look, it’s code orange. And we’re an RGB. We’re not in CMYK,” because otherwise. . .
Jeff:
This is the wavelength. This is the wavelength of light that we’re at now.
Casey:
Yeah. Yeah, exactly. And we also how to know that high and low ends of that wavelength. I don’t know what they are.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
You know, they might not, they might be 20 megahertz Yeah, it’s ultraviolet the end [?], who knows? Yeah.
Casey:
Right. Exactly.
Jeff:
Or maybe not. Maybe it’s a visible spectrum. It’s infrared.
Casey:
Right. Exactly.
Jeff:
How much the [xx] for some after. Is infrared included?
Casey:
Yeah, I don’t know. We have to know.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
So, the whole system is just. . . It’s also really. . .
Jeff:
Well, if you look at what happened too. If you look at air terrorism, right? So, airports are the toughest thing to do terrorism in.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
And they did it.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
You failed, right?
Casey:
That seemed to be a problem.
Jeff:
If it was security that was keeping things safe, the problems would have happened somewhere else. It would have been a truck bomb.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
It would have been a train bombing, a mall bombing, was it?
Casey:
Something. . .
Jeff:
Guess what? It doesn’t work.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
Sorry.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
It turns out hackers get into a system when they want to as if we didn’t know that.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Deal with it.
Casey:
Right. You have to turn to a back up system.
Jeff:
Yes.
Casey:
So what we need at the airports is additional security. So what we’re determined. . .
Jeff:
Yeah but the problem was not in the security.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
That’s always the governmental conclusion for things, right?
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
When something like the CIA totally failed with their intelligence or whatever.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
The answer is more of that.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Whatever it was. More intelligence because like, no the answer is stop doing that because it doesn’t work, obviously. [Casey laughs]
Casey:
It’s never worked.
Jeff:
Right?
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
That’s the Einstein quote, right? It’s like madness is doing the same thing as most of the time so it’s like in different results. It’s like yeah, you can’t do something more and think that that’s going to work as your indications are that that thing doesn’t work.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
Maybe you’ll get lucky and as like you’re worth pass the critical point. It’s like you didn’t get above this threshold.
Casey:
All right.
Jeff:
We’re magically starts to work. But guess what? Most things, they’re fairly correlated.
Casey:
Right. Exactly.
Jeff:
The more you have, the better it works if it was working.
Casey:
Well, my trip was especially awesome that I took because not only that they loose my luggage.
Jeff:
Wow.
Casey:
They lost it both directions. They lost it. . .
Jeff:
So you bought more luggages?
Casey:
Wait. No.
Jeff:
Or they eventually found it?
Casey:
Right. They’d find it. And then, they’d drive it up to you.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
And the first one was. . . I mean, I assume they were going to lose it, because they sent us the wrong gate. I missed my connecting flight.
Jeff:
Okay.
Casey:
So it went to an airport. [crosstalk]
Casey:
Yeah. It’s a goner.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
And here is the awesome thing. When I got to Florida, the good thing is I put my keys. . . My key’s in my pocket. So, I put them in my luggage and then I was like [as if aghast]. So, good thing this didn’t happen on my way to Seattle or I’d be screwed. That’s what happened?
Jeff:
You put your keys in your luggage?
Casey:
Guess what happened on the way back? They lost my luggage and I had the thought in Florida about taking my keys out and I didn’t do it.
Jeff:
You are retarded.
Casey:
Oh.
Jeff:
That’s retarded.
Casey:
Oh, it was not a good answer.
Jeff:
I’ve never heard of that [xx].
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
You put your keys in your luggage?
Casey:
I don’t like it in my pocket. I like to travel light.
Jeff:
Put them in your carry on.
Casey:
I don’t bring a carry on.
Jeff:
Oh.
Casey:
I bring nothing.
Jeff:
Except to drive back at luggage.
Casey:
I bring an iPhone. That’s it. And I check everything else. And I give evil eyes to all of the people bringing progressively. . . The enlargement of the carry ons. . .
Jeff:
Is this pretty [xx]?
Casey:
It’s pretty insane.
Jeff:
It’s pretty growing and growing, and growing. Good.
Casey:
But apparently, that’s the thing you do.
Jeff:
Can you imagine how awesome it would be if all of the money spent on air port security was instead spent on getting your luggage to you? [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
Right?
Casey:
It would be highly sophisticated. You know, the problem was this. . .
Jeff:
Better yet again. Like if you could just go to the plane with your luggage and hand it to a dude who puts you in the belly of the plane.
Casey:
So you could see it happen. Right.
Jeff:
And when you get off that plane, you go down and get a life.
Casey:
Right. Yeah. That would be crazy.
Jeff:
You don’t, oftentimes, go on greyhound and go, “They lost my luggage.” [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
You know why? ‘Cause it’s under your seat in the bus, right? [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
It’s like in a compartment, underneath the bus. You get off. And if you lost your luggage ‘cause you go get it from under the bus, right?
Casey:
Well, I’ve heard from a couple of people who do lots of travelling, who just travel all the time.
Casey:
They use FedEx. They FedEx their clothes to the next place because it has tracking. It’s there the next day. They just wake up
Jeff:
They know that it actually gets there?
Casey:
It’s just going to get there.
Jeff:
I see.
Casey:
So, I’ve heard that for like seasons’ travellers that’s supposed to be the safest way to go. You never lose yourself.
Jeff:
Now, if you can actually FedEx yourself. . .
Casey:
Yeah, get in a box.
Jeff:
You could bypass this airport [expletive] altogether.
Casey:
That’s right.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
That’s exactly right. No, what’s the other thing that I was going to talk about? Oh, the Atlantic Airport. There are restaurants everywhere, and I’ve talked about the fact that we’re going to lose ourselves, just one big massive case.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
Just one big massive case, diabetes is going to. . . I mean, it’s sad and they say —
Jeff:
It’s already happening.
Casey:
Yeah. It’s insane. In my. . . I was in a thing with 20 gates.
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
B1 — B20.
Jeff:
I thought you said something. . . I thought the phrase you just said was “I was in a thing with 20 gays.” And I was like, “Oh is it like a chorus line or something?”
Casey:
No.
Jeff:
But then you said like gates, I was like “Oh!”
Casey:
Gates, I said. No, it was gates.
Jeff:
‘Got it.
Casey:
And there was a Popeye’s Pizza, as a marking to my ‘the end’ of it.
Jeff:
I thought Popeye’s the chicken place.
Casey:
It is. I’m sorry. Popeye’s Chicken. Sorry. I don’t know why I said pizza. I’m walking down the thing. There’s one of those. It smells really good. As a vegetarian boy, that smell of fried chicken still helps me.
Jeff:
I seem to remember liking Popeye’s Chicken back I haven’t had it in a long time because they don’t have one here, or do they?
Casey:
I kept going 11 more gates, another Popeye’s. For those of you. . .
Jeff:
Right. If you finish the drum stick, which means,
Casey:
Yeah, or we’re like if you’re on, B1. . .
Jeff:
Right.
Casey:
You don’t want to go to B13. You want to stop at B6.
Jeff:
It’s not. . . No, I think you’re misinterpreting. It’s not that you don’t want to go to B13. It is that you can’t make it.
Casey:
Oh okay. I see.
Jeff:
It would be inconceivable to get there.
Casey:
I see. That could very well be it.
Jeff:
You’re not going to make it.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
But they have the four. . .
Casey:
That’s too much chicken.
Jeff:
Is they had only one Popeye’s Chicken in the airport and a pile of dead fat people halfway between that and B1. [Casey laughs] And they are like well, [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
Either we can introduce one of those moving walk way things in between these two places or we better put in another [expletive] Popeye’s Chicken.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
So they’re putting another Popeye’s Chicken it was cheaper then before walkway.
Casey:
I see.
Jeff:
Decision made, right?
Casey:
Done.
Jeff:
That’s my take on that.
Casey:
That’s too much chicken, my friend. In my connecting flight that I missed. . .
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
When I got to the plane so late, they’d already sold my ticket first class, so I was back in sturge [?].
Jeff:
Nice.
Casey:
Right?
Jeff:
You had to slum it [?].
Casey:
Yeah, I had to slum it. I ended up between a couple, who had chosen not to sit next to each other.
Jeff:
Because their flab would have . . . Yeah.
Casey:
Because they would have been too much rubbage [sp], right? Yeah.
Casey:
There might be something there. I ended up sitting in between these nice couple. . .
Jeff:
Wow.
Casey:
Who, no [expletive] were eating Popeye’s chicken. [Jeff laughs]
Casey:
We were stuck on the tarmac for 45 minutes while we were waiting for a churn. They didn’t have the plane plugged in they have to plug it in to go air conditioned. [laughter]
Casey:
No air conditioning. It was 100 degrees and between these two people eating chicken. It was like a vegetarian . . .
Jeff:
Vegetarian hell.
Casey:
And not a person that likes people. I was losing my [expletive] mind. I was about to lose my mind and just do one of those things where you break out of the airplane and then you get blacklisted for five years.
Jeff:
Five years, yeah.
Casey:
I was close.
Jeff:
I can’t find. Yeah, exactly.
Casey:
Not because I was never afraid of flying but it’s because I’m afraid of these two fat people.
Jeff:
Fat people chicken. [Casey laughs]
Casey:
It was creepy.
Jeff:
Do they have buckets? Did they have buckets at Popeye’s as that of the KFC’s?
Casey:
No. Buckets. Yeah. In fact, they’re even red and white so they kind of look like it. They’re just like going forth.
Jeff:
Some kind of mass copper [cross talk]
Casey:
I don’t know. I think it’s like red and white makes people think, “Oh, that’s chicken.” Of course, it is.
Jeff:
Yeah, and so the red and white strips chicken sign?
Casey:
Yeah. Exactly.
Jeff:
You know what’s kind of interesting about that is Kentucky Fried Chicken always used to be Kentucky Fried Chicken. And then, they have that massive rebranding campaign. And now, everyone thinks of it as KFC, like it’s totally worked. Like I was things work just like totally worked.
Casey:
Well, they had to do it because before, you had this. . . you essentially had this plantation hurr [sp].
Jeff:
Right. Exactly.
Casey:
This slave master who was like “Hey come on down and eat my chicken.” And then, they realize that like this isn’t going to fly.
Jeff:
He’s caught on picking good.
Casey:
Yeah. [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
Yeah. Colonel sanders and there’s [expletive] like white bird day [sp], over here, serving you the chicken.
Casey:
Yeah, exactly. And so, they had to do something. I’m not sure if I would have gone there but yeah, they had to get rid of.
Jeff:
Right. They wanted to see him hipper [sp]
Casey:
Sladey mix slave [sp]
Jeff:
Yeah. Exactly.
Casey:
From being the face of the corporation.
Jeff:
Uncle Tom’s Chicken. [Jeff laughs]
Casey:
It’s not the way it should go. Right.
Casey:
Oh my [ ].
Jeff:
Okay. I believe that. I’m just thinking I was surprised with how effective that campaign was.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Because you’ll never call it KFC before that, and now, everyone calls it KFC.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
It was a smashing success on the public. Like that time when they change in your times logged but I never noticed. [?]
Casey:
Well, I think, it’s just the whole thing of like even things that are short now have the three letter acronym thing. It’s just the sign how lazy we have become, you know?
Jeff:
Yes. It’s right. So not only can I not walk six extra gates to get my chicken.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
But I didn’t have to pronounce the whole name.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
If they don’t even want to say, “chicken”, let’s just shorten that to a grunt. That particular grunt that means more chicken.
Casey:
Sure.
Jeff:
It’s like “huh”, and they give you a bucket.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
And you go “huh, huh” that’s two buckets for an extra large bucket to better gum [?]the circumstances, I guess.
Casey:
Stop it.
Jeff:
What’s the deal with the buckets anyway? Did someone do some kind of mathematical packing thing where they’re like the most efficient way to get someone chicken is in a bucket like you’ll get any other food in a bucket. A bucket is no longer considered as a bad sign. It’s like when you see someone carrying a bucket out of a restaurant, you assume that it’s a bunch of [expletive] you didn’t want.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
Like it’s the [expletive] they can throw out. But here, it’s like no no. I’m going for the bucket.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
The bucket is a plus.
Casey:
Well, they’re really just forward-thinking like the next big restaurant is going to be the one that comes with the trowel, right? [Jeff laughs]
Casey:
It’s a great, big thing.
Jeff:
There’s just one bucket for the whole party and you could all dump your head in there.
Casey:
You just put it on there and you all dip your head in.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
But you know, it’s everybody can eat from it at the same time. The cool thing is this. . . you just slide the trowel back and forth. It’s like a community thing.
Casey:
You know those revolving — where you put the food in that revolves around the Indian restaurants?
Jeff:
Yeah. Right.
Casey:
It’s like that, only a trowel.
Jeff:
In my mind, I think you might be going the wrong direction. I’m thinking that maybe what they’ll do is something more like there’s just like this little nipple thing that you continue to suck on. And it just like dispenses gravy or something, you know what I mean? Like this is the gravy nipple. Like they’re just like you know what? Kids already know how to breastfeed. . .-
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
When they’re like zero years old. Why complicate things?
Casey:
Right. Why mess with the good thing? Right.
Jeff:
Just let’s have them suck on something for the rest of their lives.
Casey:
Yeah.
Jeff:
And they’ll just put different [expletive] in there.
Casey:
That doesn’t sound too bad to me.
Jeff:
Like old country buffet or just be like a row of nipples and then you suck on whatever it is that you’re trying to eat.
Casey:
Oh man.
Jeff:
Take others to mashed potato nipple. [Casey laughs]
Jeff:
Here’s the gravy nipple.
Casey:
Right.
Jeff:
The chicken nipple.
Casey:
Well, like you want to get gravy and mashed potato? See, you have to suck on one for a little bit and then, hold it in your mouth. And then go to the other one and mix it in.
Jeff:
It’s like grilling it into the side of your mouth.
Casey:
Exactly.
Jeff:
Yeah.
Casey:
This is the worst podcast ever.
Jeff:
Yeah, probably.
Casey:
This is ever going to be listened to? That’s my question.
Jeff:
No, this one recording?
Casey:
Probably not?
Jeff:
Probably not.
Casey:
All right.
Jeff:
Well, in case, this does air for some unknown reason, and you would like to contact the Jeff and Casey Show, you can send topic suggestions or anything else that you want to podcast@jeffandcaseyshow.com.
Casey:
Your chicken recipes.
Jeff:
You can go to jeffandcaseshow.com and can catch up on those links to Facebook or Twitter or anything else you want to do social media wise and that’s pretty much all there is to say.
Casey:
That’s all we have to say.
Jeff:
Have your chicken in a bucket and we’ll see you next week.
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casey muratori
the jeff and casey show - season 2 - episode 9
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